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Advantages of Online Learning

Let’s get down to business 

 

 

With busy days and busy schedules the days seem to fly by without a trace, leaving no space for those small things that we would like to accomplish. In modern society many individuals do more than one thing throughout their day, this could either be working two jobs or working and studying. With that being said fees often leave a big hole in our pockets although there are a few things that can be done about it, namely online learning. Registration can be done online.

Advantages of online learning:

  • Lower cost than presented course
  • Complete courses at your own pace
  • Full understanding through your own experience
  • Complete courses in the comfort of your office or home
  • Support is provided
  • Online courses have a positive impact on your CV

When a company grows their employees need to evolve. This can be done through having online training courses for your employees to make them more valuable to the organization and creating a better connection and loyalty, serving as an asset to the company. At Eskilz we offer a 50% off all short courses and qualifications for our employees and their children.

https://eskilzcollege.co.za/courses/

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How to manage your time during final exams

With Matric finals underway and learners heading to exam venues, the bulk of reviewing should now be over, and the limited time available during the exams should be strategically managed, an education expert says.

The National Senior Certificate exams represent the culmination of 12 years of hard work, and will play an important part in determining what options are open to you after school. But even though the final exams are an undeniably important milestone, learners shouldn’t become overwhelmed by the stress of exams and the fear of failure.

Planning and reviewing should now move from the general to the specific by doing the following:

GET ORGANISED

Just before you enter the exam period is a good time to review your study schedule. What work do you still need to cover, and how much time will you have between papers? Draw up a new roster taking into account the realities of the next few weeks and ensure you stick to it.

Create a neat working environment and a clear plan for what you need to do and study every day, and ensure that you have all the necessary materials sorted and on hand.

NARROW DOWN YOUR REVIEWING

Once you enter the exam period, you should have adequately covered all your materials. With little time available between papers, you must now focus your attention on the sections of work that are almost certainly going to be tested and master them, rather than trying to re-read all your textbooks in their entirety.

BREATHE, AND GET YOUR HEAD IN THE RIGHT SPACE

Your biggest weapon right now is the ability to remain calm and perform under pressure. Download one of the many mindfulness apps available online (Headspace is a good one), and invest 5-10 minutes in calming down your nerves before you step into the exam room. Managing your anxiety ahead of each paper will go a long way towards helping you avoid mind blanks during the exam.

STAY HEALTHY

Don’t start stress-eating or staying up into the early morning hours before an exam to cram. No matter how hard you worked, if your body and mind are tired and worn out, you won’t be able to accurately reflect your effort in your papers.

Take regular scheduled breaks, get plenty of water, exercise and sleep, and ensure you eat as healthy as possible.

DON’T STRESS ABOUT PAPERS ALREADY WRITTEN, BUT DON’T RELAX TOO SOON EITHER

As the exam progresses and the list of subjects you still need to write become shorter and shorter, don’t start relaxing too soon. Keeping the focus right until the end and working for each mark can mean the difference between being accepted into the institution and course of your choice, or having to look at other options.

On the other hand, if things didn’t go well in one subject, let it go and focus on what lies ahead. Stop stressing about the subjects you’ve already written, because there is nothing more you can do about those results. You can, however, still make up for a disappointment by focusing and performing as well as possible in upcoming papers.

DEFER YOUR CONCERNS, BUT KEEP THE END GOAL IN MIND

What if I don’t pass as well as I need to? Have I left applying to uni too late? Don’t let questions such as these take up mental energy during the exams. Instead, keep a laser focus on the task at hand – doing as well as possible on each paper, and earning every point you possibly can.

It is helpful to continually visualise your plans for next year, and match that dream with the performance you need to get there. But don’t let these motivational thoughts turn negative. After the exams, you still have time to investigate all your study options, and to match your interests and performance to the amazing higher education paths available..

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How to manage your time during final exams

With Matric finals underway and learners heading to exam venues, the bulk of reviewing should now be over, and the limited time available during the exams should be strategically managed, an education expert says.

The National Senior Certificate exams represent the culmination of 12 years of hard work, and will play an important part in determining what options are open to you after school. But even though the final exams are an undeniably important milestone, learners shouldn’t become overwhelmed by the stress of exams and the fear of failure.

Planning and reviewing should now move from the general to the specific by doing the following:

GET ORGANISED

Just before you enter the exam period is a good time to review your study schedule. What work do you still need to cover, and how much time will you have between papers? Draw up a new roster taking into account the realities of the next few weeks and ensure you stick to it.

Create a neat working environment and a clear plan for what you need to do and study every day, and ensure that you have all the necessary materials sorted and on hand.

NARROW DOWN YOUR REVIEWING

Once you enter the exam period, you should have adequately covered all your materials. With little time available between papers, you must now focus your attention on the sections of work that are almost certainly going to be tested and master them, rather than trying to re-read all your textbooks in their entirety.

BREATHE, AND GET YOUR HEAD IN THE RIGHT SPACE

Your biggest weapon right now is the ability to remain calm and perform under pressure. Download one of the many mindfulness apps available online (Headspace is a good one), and invest 5-10 minutes in calming down your nerves before you step into the exam room. Managing your anxiety ahead of each paper will go a long way towards helping you avoid mind blanks during the exam.

STAY HEALTHY

Don’t start stress-eating or staying up into the early morning hours before an exam to cram. No matter how hard you worked, if your body and mind are tired and worn out, you won’t be able to accurately reflect your effort in your papers.

Take regular scheduled breaks, get plenty of water, exercise and sleep, and ensure you eat as healthy as possible.

DON’T STRESS ABOUT PAPERS ALREADY WRITTEN, BUT DON’T RELAX TOO SOON EITHER

As the exam progresses and the list of subjects you still need to write become shorter and shorter, don’t start relaxing too soon. Keeping the focus right until the end and working for each mark can mean the difference between being accepted into the institution and course of your choice, or having to look at other options.

On the other hand, if things didn’t go well in one subject, let it go and focus on what lies ahead. Stop stressing about the subjects you’ve already written, because there is nothing more you can do about those results. You can, however, still make up for a disappointment by focusing and performing as well as possible in upcoming papers.

DEFER YOUR CONCERNS, BUT KEEP THE END GOAL IN MIND

What if I don’t pass as well as I need to? Have I left applying to uni too late? Don’t let questions such as these take up mental energy during the exams. Instead, keep a laser focus on the task at hand – doing as well as possible on each paper, and earning every point you possibly can.

It is helpful to continually visualise your plans for next year, and match that dream with the performance you need to get there. But don’t let these motivational thoughts turn negative. After the exams, you still have time to investigate all your study options, and to match your interests and performance to the amazing higher education paths available..

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Funding options for your studies

Looking for a means to fund your studies can be one of the most stressful aspects when thinking of furthering your studies, but there are many options for students who are not financially able to simply pay for each course.

Most of the bigger universities in South Africa offer financial aid to students who are unable to fund their studies and/or have achieved excellent academic results (even more reason to hit the books in matric!)

1. Financial Aid

If you are not in the financial position to pay for your studies, Financial Aid is ample at many of the bigger institutions. You can be eligible for financial aid for a variety of things – primarily of course, if you are not in a financial position to pay for your fees. But there are also financial aid options for people who have excelled in previous studies or academics. To find out whether you are eligible for this aid, you will have to make a stop at your institution’s financial aid office, as details differ from varsity to varsity or college to college.

2. Bursaries & Scholarships

If you’re not interested in taking out a loan and have a good academic record you should consider looking for a bursary or a scholarship. While many universities will know of bursaries that are available to students (so you should definitely ask about these), you can also benefit from looking for your own bursary or scholarship.

3. Student Loans

Student loans are another option for students who are looking to fund their studies – most bank institutions have financing options for students. It is important to consider what taking out a student loan from a bank means. It requires the student begin paying back the loan after they graduate. Student loans also have a huge interest mark-up and require the student start paying between 3-6 months after graduating. It is important to note that you will need a parent or guardian to sign surety and pay the interest until you graduate and can start paying back the loan.

4. NSFAS

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is an option that often works in conjunction with your university of choice by providing funding for students who have little to no familial incomeNSFAS is a government organisation which aims to provide an efficient and sustainable financial aid system for poor yet academically eligible students. NSFAS enables these kinds of students to obtain loans and bursaries at 26 public higher education institutions and 50 technical and vocational education training colleges.

A student who receives a NSFAS loan is required to start paying back the loan at the beginning of the year after the student has become employed or becomes self-employed (irrespective of whether the student has completed his or her studies).

5. Part-time Work

If all else fails, you have the option of working and studying part-time. This is certainly a harder option.  It is one which requires a vast amount of dedication to complete your studies, while being focused and committed to your day job. If working full-time and studying part-time is not an option, consider getting a student job. This can help take the pressure off your parents providing money for living expenses.

There are so many ways to fund your studies in South Africa, so don’t despair if one option doesn’t work for you. The best strategy is always to ask as many questions as you can. Talk to your university or college about funding, job opportunities, bursaries and scholarships.  They might know how to help you fund the most important decision of your life!

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ECD leaners looking for placement

Over 350 learners with disabilities have enrolled for the Early Childhood Development level 4 learnership at Eskilz College. The learners are doing three to four months theory and nine to 10 months practicals, and next year they will be enrolling in level 5 which will qualify them as Grade R teachers working with children from the ages 0-6 years.
The goal for Eskilz College is to close the gap in the demand for Early Childhood Practitioners and to provide skills and employment for people with disabilities.
An Early Childhood Development qualification affords these learners with career opportunities such as working at ECD centres, primary schools and crèches. But Eskilz doesn’t just want it to end there; the learners will be assisted to register with The South African Council of Educators (SACE) and also assisted and encouraged to open up their own ECD centres in their communities.

Eskilz College is looking for partners to place these learners to do their work placement next year, we are looking for ECD centres, Primary schools and any institutions that need ECD practitioners. The placement will be a 9 to 10 months internship.

The learners are receiving a monthly stipend that covers transport for their theory. This is a great opportunity for the learners and a good way to close the national gap in the need for early childhood practitioners.

To enquire or place a learner contact coo@timmalholding.co.za or call 0100 3000 80

 OPTIONS

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Are short courses as relevant as full courses

What are Short Courses?

A short course is a great way to acquire new skills or to enhance (or refresh) your existing skills.

The course material is designed in such a way as to incorporate the theory behind the skill and the reasons why you need the skill. Courses are presented in such a way that students are easily able to relate to the content. The course content also contains numerous examples of how to apply the relevant skills in a practical environment.

How long does a short course take?

The study duration of a short course does not usually exceed a few months. This should come as a great relief, especially to those who are nervous about studying. It is quite natural to be afraid of the unknown. Short courses, however, are not scary or daunting at all. The aim of this type of course is to transfer skills in an accessible and convenient manner – hence all the practical examples. There are no examinations to study for, and students will usually not be required to submit more than a few assignments.

What is the difference between a short course and a full course?

There are a number of differences between short courses and diplomas. A diploma usually takes between one and three years to complete. Diploma courses are made up of various subjects or modules and may include components that do not interest you. You will generally be required to write examinations in order to obtain a diploma. A short course, however, requires less long-term commitment, as it should only take you a few months to complete. You will generally not be required to write any examinations.There are various types of short courses on offer. Some are designed to assist you in your current job, whilst others are industry specific and are aimed at people who would like to change careers or enter into new industries.You can enroll for both short courses and diplomas through distance learning.

Where can I study?

Gone are the days where you were geographically limited to studying courses at institutions in your current town or city. You can study a short course from anywhere in the country. You do not need physical access to a school or college anymore.You can now study via distance learning from the comfort and safety of your own home. If you struggle with the course material or need a little encouragement, friendly tutors and counsellors will only be a phone call or e-mail away.

Why should I study a short course?

There are many reasons for choosing to study a short course:

  • You can become a better employee by acquiring new skills.
  • You can update or enhance your existing skills.
  • You can acquire knowledge and skills that will enable you to change careers.
  • You can improve your CV by obtaining formal recognition for skills that you have gained through practical experience.
  • You can start with a short course in a particular subject to find out whether you have the aptitude for pursuing further studies in that field.

 

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Latest South African Education Statistics

This update takes a look at the results of the latest General Household Survey (GHS) published by Statistics South Africa and the information relating to education. The table below published by Statistics South Africa shows various metrics related to education. The table published by Statistics South Africa shows various metrics related education https://www.southafricanmi.com/education-statistics.html

The worrying number from the table above is the Repetition rate (RR) of Grd 10 ‘s which is sitting with 22.5%, basically saying 22.5% of households in South Africa reported they have a child repeating Grd 10 and 20.5% of households stated that they have a child repeating Grd 11. Note the results of the GHS is based on a sample of households selected. There will therefore be some bias built into the numbers (selection/sample bias), reporting bias etc. The numbers above are therefore the best estimate of the population as a whole based on the selected sample. The table published here https://www.southafricanmi.com/education-statistics.html  is a continuation of the table above, showing additional metrics related to education in South Africa.

In total 11.4% of households reported children work for longer than 30 minutes to the nearest school. 22.2% of households in KwaZulu-Natal reported children work for more than 30 minutes to get to school, while only 1.2% of households in the Western Cape reported children walked more than 30 minutes to get to school.

Another worrying statistic for South Africa is the adult literacy rate, which is defined as people over the age of 20 with Grd 7 as the highest level of education is sitting at 13.8%. The province with the highest adult literacy rate is the Eastern Cape (20.5%), closely followed by Limpopo (19.7%) and Northern Cape (19.1%).

Number of registered students at higher education institutions (31 October 2017)

This section will take a look at the number of students registered at various higher education institutions across South Africa, at various points in time. Interesting to note is the increase of student numbers at specific institutions from 2012 to 2016 while there are strong declines at other institutions. https://www.southafricanmi.com/education-statistics.html

While the number of students enrolled has increased by 2.4% from 2012 to 2016, the number of students that graduated has increased by 22.3%. Clearly showing number of graduates increasing is not just due to the number of students increasing. The image below shows the total value of grants paid by national government to various higher education institutions. And it is clear to see that grants paid increased sharply after the #FeesMustFall campaign. Interesting to note that the growth in grants paid is growing a lot faster for Universities compared to University of Technologies.

While we mentioned earlier that University of Pretoria (TUKS) showed a decline in student numbers, the graphic below shows that it has not detered TUKS from spending money on upgrading their facilities and equipment (as their Capex spending accounts from over 10% of total capital expenditure by all higher education institutions. Surely this bodes well for the quality of education at TUKS, is there are less students yet better facilities and equipment. Stellenbosch University and WITS makes up the rest of the top three when it comes to capital expenditure by higher education institutions.

Percentage of students per race group that obtain a bachelors degree after matric.

White students parents are more like to afford better primary and secondary schooling, and more likely to be able to pay for tertiary education, hence the higher percentage of white students obtaining bachelors degrees after matriculating With around 25% of white students obtaining a bachelors degree after matric, Indian/Asians comes a distant second with around 15% while both Coloured and Black Africans sitting around 5% of students obtaining a bachelors degree after matric. Concerning to see is the decline in the percentage of Coloured and Black African students obtaining bachelors degrees after school. Again part of this is due to a lack of funding from these race groups, making it harder for students from these groups to enter a higher education institutions. And this is part of the reason for the whole #feesmustfall campaign that swept across South Africa.

Number of learners per school grade (11 March 2016)

The funnel chart below is based on statistics from the Basic Education Department. It shows the number of learners registered per grade in South Africa. What is concerning to note that around 1,2 million learners are registered for Grade 1. Yet only 680 000 odd makes it to Grade 12.

Number of learners per school grade: 2015

Data from the Department of Higher Education showed the number of new graduates that registered at Higher Education Institutes (such as Varsities, Universities of Technologies etc.) coming in at 158 000 in 2013. Thus assuming all the new registrations were matriculants of the previous year (which roughly totals 700 000) , only 22% of martriculants or about 1 in 5 makes it to Higher Education Institutions (HEI) after school. Looking at it a little differently, only 12% (or around 1 in 9) of school children entering grade 1 will make it to HEI if this trend continues.

 This is a serious concern as the higher the level of education the greater the chance of being employed.

Source: Statistics South Africa.

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Why you need to choose relevant courses

Choosing a career is all about passion, your passion for your course, and for your future career. Because the secret to happiness is being able to love whatever it is you do in life.

And what does this all have to do with choosing the right course for you? It all starts here. Find the right course, at the right university or college, and you will be inspired to succeed.

So how do you make the right choice? Check our Top 5 tips on choosing your course for the lowdown on getting where you want to be – faster.

Top tip #1: Why?

The most important consideration when choosing your course is asking yourself why you are looking to study.

Do you want to further your career by extending your skill set? If this is the case you should choose a course in a subject that is a natural progression of your existing skills and qualifications. If the aim is to progress further with your current employer selecting a course that is relevant to your work is recommended. Discussing study options with your peers, colleagues or employer can help to determine what qualification will help with your career.

Are you looking to diversify your knowledge or change career path completely? Studying may be necessary if you are looking to change careers. If this is your motivation for studying it is important that you consider what career you wish to pursue.  Studying can be expensive, so be sure to fully research any prospective career.

In summary:

Think about your existing experience and skill set.

Consider prospective careers and employment opportunities.

Think about what subjects interest you.

Talk to your employer, colleagues or peers about which courses are relevant and may improve your career.

Top tip #2: What are you really interested in?

It’s really important to think about what you are interested in, and what course you want to study. Is it because you can see your exciting, glittering career ahead? Or is it because it’s what your parents want? By questioning yourself now, you can work out the exact path you want your course to take you on.

Top tip #3: Take a reality check

Now that you have found your dream, let’s just stop a minute and make sure it’s realistic. Can you afford transport, tuition and cost of living? Do you need to have certain qualifications first – English language proficiency? Don’t get discouraged – a bridging program may be all you need to cross those hurdles. If this really is your passion, prove it in your scholarship application and you may get some financial help.

This is also the point where you need to realistically think about how long you want to study for. To help you decide here are some example study durations for full-time study:

Postgraduate Certificate – 6 months

Undergraduate Degree – 3 years

MA – 1 year

PhD – 4 years

Top tip #4: Do your homework

You need to narrow down all your options to about five real, practical choices. That takes a lot of research. Read student blogs to see what it’s really like. Glossy prospectuses don’t always tell you the full story, so talk to people you know who have studied in that city or town about what it’s really like.

Top tip #5: What’s important to you?

While you are researching, you’ll come up with all kinds of different criteria to judge a university/college or course by. So, make a shortlist of the top three features you’re looking for. These could be school ranking or prestige, research facilities, practical experience and internships, cost of tuition, student support services, safety, social life, chance to travel… there are so many variables, and what’s right for you may be completely wrong for someone else.

Don’t spend the next five years of your life staring at textbooks you have no interest in whatsoever. Remember, it’s all about your passion – keep the excitement alive, and you will succeed!.

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Full time or Part time studying?

As learners continue to pursue more flexible ways of studying, which allows individuals to structure their education around their family and work commitments, the traditional separation of full-time and part-time learning is increasingly getting less distinct. When looking for a study platform that fits your circumstances, there are various factors to consider, including the type of career you are looking for, the degree that will allow you to continue with your work engagements, the fees, and your chances of getting a job. All these factors are important, although some bear more weight than others. A critical consideration, which you must prioritize from the beginning is the amount of time you want to allocate to your studies. You must give yourself sufficient time to enjoy the process and meet deadlines. As such, what exactly should you consider when choosing between full-time and part-time studies?

Difference between Full and Part-Time Studies

To understand which study load is appropriate for you, a good starting point is differentiating between full time and part time learning. As may be expected, there is no universally agreed definition on part-time and full-time studying. One definition that is generally used relates to the threshold that is based on study or credit hours.

Benefits of Full Times Studies

The benefits of full-time studies are numerous and can be summarised in terms of:

Time

Graduation rates

Involvement

In terms of time, depending on the number of classes taken, full-time students can complete their courses faster than part-time students. The choice of each student will depend on future goals and plans. Studying on a full-time basis allows you to focus more intensively without interruptions.

With regards to graduation rates, evidence shows that your enrollment status may affect your graduation prospects. Research shows that full-time students demonstrate higher graduation rates compared to part-time students. This variance could be explained by the fact that part-time students not only take fewer modules but also face other commitments and hurdles, which can be challenging when combined with classwork.

Full-time studies also allow immersion, where students are involved in on-campus activities. College experience, through the immersion, is an important part of learning and creating networks, which could be useful for your future professional career. These opportunities are minimal for part-time students.

How to Handle Full-Time Studies

Despite the benefits offered by full-time studies, the scheduling can be hectic and may require some strategies for you to succeed. Some of the tips you could use include:

Organize

Prioritize tasks

Set clear goals

Schedule socialisation and exercise

By being organized, you can get to control your schedule. Take note of what needs to be done and when, there are various tools you could use to organise, including a planner, a calendar or an organiser.. Secondly, you must prioritize your work to make sure that the most important are completed first. Setting clear goals will help improve your focus and assess progress. Make sure that your goals are specific and obtainable. Most importantly, make sure to include time for socialization and exercise in your schedule. These activities will help you to not only unwind but can also be critical to your overall mental and physical health.

Benefits of Part-Time Studies

While part-time studies limit your access to financial aid, there are some key benefits you are likely to get. For students who wish to combine study and work or with other commitments, part-time studies are an ideal option. In addition, by working and studying at the same time, students get to apply the knowledge gained from the classroom directly in work situations. Your experiences in the professional environment will also add relevance and depth to your academic progress. Moreover, for those with various professional and personal commitments, part-time studies give the chance of pursuing both without adverse psychological pressure or mental overload.

Price Difference

As you choose your study load, it helps to be aware of the financial implications, particularly in relation to aid. While the average cost of undertaking a college course may not vary significantly between part-time and full-time options, there is a difference when it comes to financial aid. Financial aid like personal finance loans and scholarships can help ease the burden of paying for college education. However, the amount of financial aid to which you will qualify depends largely on whether your study status is part-time or full-time.

For students to qualify for student loans, they are often required to take a minimum of six credits each semester. A student registered for fewer courses is likely to have a lower tuition bill, which, in turn, lowers the amount of aid that the student can receive. Scholarships are also more limited for part-time students compared to those enrolled on a full-time basis. We, however, note that all adult students are eligible for financial aid. As such, whether studying part-time or full-time, you must always consider your financial aid alternatives.

Each student’s pathway through college and their professional and personal success is unique. However, choosing whether to study full-time or part-time can have significant implications for your academic and professional life, including graduation prospects and chances for financial aid. As has been argued in this article, part-time and full-time enrollment each comes with its own benefits and challenges. It is recommended, therefore, that as you choose between the two, you consider a combination of factors, including long-term goals, work schedule, and professional aspirations..