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EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT SOUTH AFRICA

Over 350 learners with disabilities have enrolled for the Early Childhood Development level 4 learnership at Eskilz College. The learners are doing three to four months theory and nine to 10 months practicals, and next year they will be enrolling in level 5 which will qualify them as Grade R teachers working with children from the ages 0-6 years. The goal for Eskilz College is to close the gap in the demand for Early Childhood Practitioners and to provide skills and employment for people with disabilities.
An Early Childhood Development qualification affords these learners with career opportunities such as working at ECD centres, primary schools and crèches. But Eskilz College doesn’t just want it to end there; the learners will be assisted to register with The South African Council of Educators (SACE) and also assisted and encouraged to open up their own ECD centres in their communities.

Eskilz College is looking for partners to place these learners to do their work placement next year, we are looking for ECD centres, Primary schools and any institutions that need ECD practitioners. The placement will be a 9 to 10 months internship.

The learners are receiving a monthly stipend that covers transport for their theory. This is a great opportunity for the learners and a good way to close the national gap in the need for early childhood practitioners.

To enquire or place a learner contact coo@timmalholding.co.za or call 0100 3000 80

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Funding options for your studies

Looking for a means to fund your studies can be one of the most stressful aspects when thinking of furthering your studies, but there are many options for students who are not financially able to simply pay for each course.

Most of the bigger universities in South Africa offer financial aid to students who are unable to fund their studies and/or have achieved excellent academic results (even more reason to hit the books in matric!)

1. Financial Aid

If you are not in the financial position to pay for your studies, Financial Aid is ample at many of the bigger institutions. You can be eligible for financial aid for a variety of things – primarily of course, if you are not in a financial position to pay for your fees. But there are also financial aid options for people who have excelled in previous studies or academics. To find out whether you are eligible for this aid, you will have to make a stop at your institution’s financial aid office, as details differ from varsity to varsity or college to college.

2. Bursaries & Scholarships

If you’re not interested in taking out a loan and have a good academic record you should consider looking for a bursary or a scholarship. While many universities will know of bursaries that are available to students (so you should definitely ask about these), you can also benefit from looking for your own bursary or scholarship.

3. Student Loans

Student loans are another option for students who are looking to fund their studies – most bank institutions have financing options for students. It is important to consider what taking out a student loan from a bank means. It requires the student begin paying back the loan after they graduate. Student loans also have a huge interest mark-up and require the student start paying between 3-6 months after graduating. It is important to note that you will need a parent or guardian to sign surety and pay the interest until you graduate and can start paying back the loan.

4. NSFAS

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is an option that often works in conjunction with your university of choice by providing funding for students who have little to no familial incomeNSFAS is a government organisation which aims to provide an efficient and sustainable financial aid system for poor yet academically eligible students. NSFAS enables these kinds of students to obtain loans and bursaries at 26 public higher education institutions and 50 technical and vocational education training colleges.

A student who receives a NSFAS loan is required to start paying back the loan at the beginning of the year after the student has become employed or becomes self-employed (irrespective of whether the student has completed his or her studies).

5. Part-time Work

If all else fails, you have the option of working and studying part-time. This is certainly a harder option.  It is one which requires a vast amount of dedication to complete your studies, while being focused and committed to your day job. If working full-time and studying part-time is not an option, consider getting a student job. This can help take the pressure off your parents providing money for living expenses.

There are so many ways to fund your studies in South Africa, so don’t despair if one option doesn’t work for you. The best strategy is always to ask as many questions as you can. Talk to your university or college about funding, job opportunities, bursaries and scholarships.  They might know how to help you fund the most important decision of your life!

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ECD leaners looking for placement

Over 350 learners with disabilities have enrolled for the Early Childhood Development level 4 learnership at Eskilz College. The learners are doing three to four months theory and nine to 10 months practicals, and next year they will be enrolling in level 5 which will qualify them as Grade R teachers working with children from the ages 0-6 years.
The goal for Eskilz College is to close the gap in the demand for Early Childhood Practitioners and to provide skills and employment for people with disabilities.
An Early Childhood Development qualification affords these learners with career opportunities such as working at ECD centres, primary schools and crèches. But Eskilz doesn’t just want it to end there; the learners will be assisted to register with The South African Council of Educators (SACE) and also assisted and encouraged to open up their own ECD centres in their communities.

Eskilz College is looking for partners to place these learners to do their work placement next year, we are looking for ECD centres, Primary schools and any institutions that need ECD practitioners. The placement will be a 9 to 10 months internship.

The learners are receiving a monthly stipend that covers transport for their theory. This is a great opportunity for the learners and a good way to close the national gap in the need for early childhood practitioners.

To enquire or place a learner contact coo@timmalholding.co.za or call 0100 3000 80

 OPTIONS

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Learnerships vs Internships

It is paramount to know the difference between a Learnership and an Internship. Many people, not only confuse the two, but also confuse a bursary with a learnership. The reason why it is essential to know the difference between the two is due the fact that you will be able to apply for the correct thing based on your knowledge or highest qualification, whether it be a grade 12 certificate or a degree.

Here is the difference between the two:

A Learnership offers training in a specific field while earning money simultaneously and is primarily for people with matric as their highest qualification. You should be awarded a certificate after completion of a learnership which indicates your level of achievement. You will then be able to look for a job or further your education in that specific field.

An Internship is an opportunity for people with a degree or diploma to gain practical experience in a possible place of employment or in their field of study. Interns are employed at a company for a limited amount of time which lasts from one week to 12 months. Most times, an internship is required during your study course in order to complete your qualification. Just as with a Learnership, you also get paid during an Internship.

Basically, a Learnership is better suited for someone with a grade 12 as their highest education, while an internship benefits someone who is actively completing their degree or diploma and an apprenticeship is a 3-4-year labour programme that trains you in a very specific trade.

For learnership opportunities, contact Eskilz College admin@eskilz.co.za 0100300080.

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Latest South African Education Statistics

This update takes a look at the results of the latest General Household Survey (GHS) published by Statistics South Africa and the information relating to education. The table below published by Statistics South Africa shows various metrics related to education. The table published by Statistics South Africa shows various metrics related education https://www.southafricanmi.com/education-statistics.html

The worrying number from the table above is the Repetition rate (RR) of Grd 10 ‘s which is sitting with 22.5%, basically saying 22.5% of households in South Africa reported they have a child repeating Grd 10 and 20.5% of households stated that they have a child repeating Grd 11. Note the results of the GHS is based on a sample of households selected. There will therefore be some bias built into the numbers (selection/sample bias), reporting bias etc. The numbers above are therefore the best estimate of the population as a whole based on the selected sample. The table published here https://www.southafricanmi.com/education-statistics.html  is a continuation of the table above, showing additional metrics related to education in South Africa.

In total 11.4% of households reported children work for longer than 30 minutes to the nearest school. 22.2% of households in KwaZulu-Natal reported children work for more than 30 minutes to get to school, while only 1.2% of households in the Western Cape reported children walked more than 30 minutes to get to school.

Another worrying statistic for South Africa is the adult literacy rate, which is defined as people over the age of 20 with Grd 7 as the highest level of education is sitting at 13.8%. The province with the highest adult literacy rate is the Eastern Cape (20.5%), closely followed by Limpopo (19.7%) and Northern Cape (19.1%).

Number of registered students at higher education institutions (31 October 2017)

This section will take a look at the number of students registered at various higher education institutions across South Africa, at various points in time. Interesting to note is the increase of student numbers at specific institutions from 2012 to 2016 while there are strong declines at other institutions. https://www.southafricanmi.com/education-statistics.html

While the number of students enrolled has increased by 2.4% from 2012 to 2016, the number of students that graduated has increased by 22.3%. Clearly showing number of graduates increasing is not just due to the number of students increasing. The image below shows the total value of grants paid by national government to various higher education institutions. And it is clear to see that grants paid increased sharply after the #FeesMustFall campaign. Interesting to note that the growth in grants paid is growing a lot faster for Universities compared to University of Technologies.

While we mentioned earlier that University of Pretoria (TUKS) showed a decline in student numbers, the graphic below shows that it has not detered TUKS from spending money on upgrading their facilities and equipment (as their Capex spending accounts from over 10% of total capital expenditure by all higher education institutions. Surely this bodes well for the quality of education at TUKS, is there are less students yet better facilities and equipment. Stellenbosch University and WITS makes up the rest of the top three when it comes to capital expenditure by higher education institutions.

Percentage of students per race group that obtain a bachelors degree after matric.

White students parents are more like to afford better primary and secondary schooling, and more likely to be able to pay for tertiary education, hence the higher percentage of white students obtaining bachelors degrees after matriculating With around 25% of white students obtaining a bachelors degree after matric, Indian/Asians comes a distant second with around 15% while both Coloured and Black Africans sitting around 5% of students obtaining a bachelors degree after matric. Concerning to see is the decline in the percentage of Coloured and Black African students obtaining bachelors degrees after school. Again part of this is due to a lack of funding from these race groups, making it harder for students from these groups to enter a higher education institutions. And this is part of the reason for the whole #feesmustfall campaign that swept across South Africa.

Number of learners per school grade (11 March 2016)

The funnel chart below is based on statistics from the Basic Education Department. It shows the number of learners registered per grade in South Africa. What is concerning to note that around 1,2 million learners are registered for Grade 1. Yet only 680 000 odd makes it to Grade 12.

Number of learners per school grade: 2015

Data from the Department of Higher Education showed the number of new graduates that registered at Higher Education Institutes (such as Varsities, Universities of Technologies etc.) coming in at 158 000 in 2013. Thus assuming all the new registrations were matriculants of the previous year (which roughly totals 700 000) , only 22% of martriculants or about 1 in 5 makes it to Higher Education Institutions (HEI) after school. Looking at it a little differently, only 12% (or around 1 in 9) of school children entering grade 1 will make it to HEI if this trend continues.

 This is a serious concern as the higher the level of education the greater the chance of being employed.

Source: Statistics South Africa.

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Why you need to choose relevant courses

Choosing a career is all about passion, your passion for your course, and for your future career. Because the secret to happiness is being able to love whatever it is you do in life.

And what does this all have to do with choosing the right course for you? It all starts here. Find the right course, at the right university or college, and you will be inspired to succeed.

So how do you make the right choice? Check our Top 5 tips on choosing your course for the lowdown on getting where you want to be – faster.

Top tip #1: Why?

The most important consideration when choosing your course is asking yourself why you are looking to study.

Do you want to further your career by extending your skill set? If this is the case you should choose a course in a subject that is a natural progression of your existing skills and qualifications. If the aim is to progress further with your current employer selecting a course that is relevant to your work is recommended. Discussing study options with your peers, colleagues or employer can help to determine what qualification will help with your career.

Are you looking to diversify your knowledge or change career path completely? Studying may be necessary if you are looking to change careers. If this is your motivation for studying it is important that you consider what career you wish to pursue.  Studying can be expensive, so be sure to fully research any prospective career.

In summary:

Think about your existing experience and skill set.

Consider prospective careers and employment opportunities.

Think about what subjects interest you.

Talk to your employer, colleagues or peers about which courses are relevant and may improve your career.

Top tip #2: What are you really interested in?

It’s really important to think about what you are interested in, and what course you want to study. Is it because you can see your exciting, glittering career ahead? Or is it because it’s what your parents want? By questioning yourself now, you can work out the exact path you want your course to take you on.

Top tip #3: Take a reality check

Now that you have found your dream, let’s just stop a minute and make sure it’s realistic. Can you afford transport, tuition and cost of living? Do you need to have certain qualifications first – English language proficiency? Don’t get discouraged – a bridging program may be all you need to cross those hurdles. If this really is your passion, prove it in your scholarship application and you may get some financial help.

This is also the point where you need to realistically think about how long you want to study for. To help you decide here are some example study durations for full-time study:

Postgraduate Certificate – 6 months

Undergraduate Degree – 3 years

MA – 1 year

PhD – 4 years

Top tip #4: Do your homework

You need to narrow down all your options to about five real, practical choices. That takes a lot of research. Read student blogs to see what it’s really like. Glossy prospectuses don’t always tell you the full story, so talk to people you know who have studied in that city or town about what it’s really like.

Top tip #5: What’s important to you?

While you are researching, you’ll come up with all kinds of different criteria to judge a university/college or course by. So, make a shortlist of the top three features you’re looking for. These could be school ranking or prestige, research facilities, practical experience and internships, cost of tuition, student support services, safety, social life, chance to travel… there are so many variables, and what’s right for you may be completely wrong for someone else.

Don’t spend the next five years of your life staring at textbooks you have no interest in whatsoever. Remember, it’s all about your passion – keep the excitement alive, and you will succeed!.

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TOUGH CHALLENGE AHEAD FOR NEW HIGHER EDUCATION MINISTER NALEDI PANDOR

The Higher Education Department is facing one of its most sensitive times as government works to try and address the funding crisis in tertiary institutions.

As the higher education sector grapples with phasing in free education for the poor and so-called missing middle students, Naledi Pandor has been appointed to the ministry’s hot seat.

Pandor previously served as science and technology minister for nearly four years and replaces Hlengiwe Mkhize.

The Higher Education Department is facing one of its most sensitive times as government works to try and address the funding crisis in tertiary institutions.

Pandor is no stranger to the sector as she served as minister of education from 2004 to 2009 under former presidents Thabo Mbeki and Kgalema Motlanthe.

Pandor oversaw a complete overhaul of the basic education system under her tenure and proposed reforms to the country’s failed implementation of outcomes-based education. She has also served in other portfolios in government, including minister of home affairs.

She’s now been tasked with stabilising higher education after former president Jacob Zuma’s surprise announcement late last year that government would subsidise studies for poor and working-class students.

During the Budget speech last week, former finance minister Malusi Gigaba announced government had allocated R57 billion in the medium term to fund free fees for first-year tertiary students.

It’s the largest reallocation of resources towards government’s spending priorities.

Making tertiary education fees for lower-income students free means higher education is now government’s fastest-growing spending category with an annual average growth of 13.7%.

The expense will partly be funded by revenue raised from an increase in value-added tax.

All first-year students with a family income of below R350,000 per year will be funded for the full cost of study at universities and TVET colleges.

Gigaba said this would be rolled out in subsequent years until all years of study are covered.

“This is an important step forward in breaking the cycle of poverty and confronting youth unemployment, as labour statistics show that unemployment is lowest for tertiary graduates.”

Returning students who received loans from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme will as from this year, have those loans converted into a bursary.

Zuma announced free higher education last year, in response to the Heher Commission of Inquiry..

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SONA 2018 – Summary of key points made by President Cyril Ramaphosa

Summary of Actions in the State of the Nation Address 16th February 2018

Transformation
Support black industrialists – to build a new generation of black and women producers that are able to build enterprises of significant scale and capability.
Use competition policy to open markets to new black entrants.
Invest in the development of township and rural enterprises.

Infrastructure
Assemble team to speed up implementation of new projects, particularly water projects, health facilities and road maintenance.

Mining
Intensify engagements will all stakeholders on the Mining Charter.
Finalise the MPRDA Amendment Bill by end of first quarter this year.
Stakeholder engagement to deal with mining fatalities.

Small business, co-ops, township enterprises
Honour 30% of procurement allocation to these enterprises.
Invest in SME incubation.
Welcome SME Fund initiative by corporate sector.

Land and agriculture
Accelerate our land redistribution programme AND make more land available.
Expropriate land without compensation, our approach, taking into account food security, agricultural production and growth of the sector.

Fourth industrial revolution
Digital Industrial revolution commission to be established.
Allocation of spectrum to reduce barriers to entry.

National Minimum Wage
Introduce NMW by May 1 benefiting more than 6 million South Africans.

Health and NHI
Scale up our testing and treating campaign by initiating an additional two million people on anti-retroviral treatment by December 2020.
The NHI Bill is now ready to be processed through government and will be submitted to Parliament in the next few weeks.

Education
This year free higher education and training will be available to first year students from households with a gross combined annual income of up to R350,000.
All public schools have begun offering an African language.
First National Senior Certificate examination on South African Sign Language, which will be offered to deaf learners at the end of 2018.

Social Grants
Urgently take decisive steps to comply with all directions of the Constitutional Court.
Take action to ensure no person in government is undermining implementation deadlines set by the court.

Social Sector/Civil Society
Convene a Social Sector Summit during the course of this year to recognise the critical role they play in society.

State/governance
Review the funding models of SOEs and other measures.
Change the way that boards are appointed.
Remove board members from any role in procurement.

Corruption/state capture
The commission of inquiry into state capture to commence its work shortly.
The Commission should not displace the regular work of the country’s law enforcement agencies in investigating and prosecuting any and all acts of corruption.
Urge professional bodies and regulatory authorities to take action against members who are found to have acted improperly and unethically.
Urgently attend to the leadership issues at the National Prosecuting Authority to ensure that this critical institution is stabilised and able to perform its mandate unhindered.
Appoint a Commission of Inquiry into Tax Administration and Governance of Sars.
Visit every national department to engage with senior leadership to ensure that the work of government is effectively aligned.

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WSP and ATR | What, How and Why

What is a Workplace Skills Plan?

The WSP and ATR submission deadline is just around the corner on the 31st of March 2018. Preparing and submitting these documents can be very time-consuming, confusing and frustrating. Eskilz is able to assist you and  make the process as painless as possible.

The Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) documents the skills that the company needs and to describes the range of skills development interventions that the company will use to address these needs and skills gaps.

A WSP must be developed and submitted every year in order to comply with current Skills Development legislation (SDL). The WSP is normally compiled by a registered Skills Development F acilitator (SDF) or qualified person and submitted to the relevant SETA.

By complying with the SDL, a company is granted access to various SETA grants available for skills training. In order to qualify for these grants, organisations must also ensure that their Annual Training Reports (ATR) are also submitted. This report is intended to show your progress against your last WSP – The planned against the actual training that took place.

WSP importance

A Workplace Skills Plan is meant to outline how an organisation/ employer is going to address the training and development needs within the workplace. It assists employers in identifying and providing relevant training that will address the skills gaps within the organisation. Compiling a WSP ensures that training is not only reactive to needs that emerge but also speaks to the overall organisational strategy, as well as encourages a holistic and sustainable approach to skills development. A well thought-out WSP will ensure that the skills that an organisation lacks are being addressed. This, in turn, will result in decreased training and development costs as development efforts are more focused.

How to develop a WSP

Here are a few steps when developing your WSP. Eskilz will assist employers with their WSP & ATR submissions.

Step 1 | Identify existing skills within the organisation.

Conducting a Skills Audit is the most effective way to do this. Identify the skills and knowledge that the organisation currently has and those that are lacking.

Purpose of a Skills Audit

  • To identify the skills and knowledge that the company requires or possesses currently
  • Identify and investigate the current competencies of each employee against pre-defined skill sets required to fulfill a specific job role/function.

Benefits of a Skills Audit

  • Improved skills and knowledge.
  • Decreased training and development costs as development efforts are more focused.
  • Improved succession planning for employees’ growth and development.
  • Increased productivity as people are better matched to their positions.

Step 2| Identify the skills gap within the organisation.

Once you have identified the skills that are present within the workforce, it becomes much easier to carry out the second step – identifying the skills that are missing and need to be developed. What skills are needed to achieve the strategic objectives of the organisation but are not present in the current workforce? These are the skills that need to be developed. Once again, a Skills Audit is a useful tool in identifying these gaps. Understanding where the gaps lie is an important step to any planning process and will pave the way forward for step 3.

Step 3 | Identify ways to develop skills which are lacking

These can include but not limited to:

  • Learnerships
  • Mentorship
  • In- house training
  • Online training

To view Eskilz Skills Development training and courses, click here

Aspects to consider when identifying the best way to develop skills required:

  • What is the cost of the training?
  • What level of training needs to be carried out?
  • What is the organisation’s Skills Development budget?
  • How many employees need to be trained?
  • Where will the training take place?
  • Is the training venue accessible (for staff with disabilities)?

ATR – Annual Training Report

The ATR and WSP are submitted together. The ATR shows progress against your last WSP. The report reflects the education, training and development that were implemented in the previous year. Your ATR will assist you in identifying the success/ failure of your previous efforts, thus allowing you to identify areas which you can improve on in order to remain effective and competitive. Records of all education, training and development activities should be available to confirm the information given in the report.

Items to include in your ATR:

  • The number of education, training and development activities conducted
  • Attendance registers
  • Proof of expenditure
  • Training provider used
  • The number of employees trained
  • The occupational areas covered
  • The learning methods that were used
  • How much was spent on education, training and development activities
  • Process used to develop the report
  • Name of the Skills Development Facilitator

WSP and ATR planning, compilation, execution and grant applicaiton | Eskilz is highly experienced and qualified to assist employers with their WSP & ATR submissions. For more information admin@eskilz.co.za or call 0861 375459.

 

https://eskilzcollege.co.za/2018/02/02/ministers-shocked-illiteracy-level-saps/

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Discretionary grant – SETA

Discretionary grant windows are now open

Here are the SETAs that are now open:

CATHSETA

 

 

CATHSSETA has opened the Discretionary Grants 2018/19 window, which will close on 15 January 2018.  Discretionary grant funding, is funding available from the SETA for you to train your staff members.

The benefits of Discretionary grants:

  •         The grant can assist with upskilling your employees
  •         The grant can assist you with your Skills Spend under your BBBEE scorecard
  •         Address scarce and critical skills within the sector.

The following types of interventions are available that Eskilz can assist you in applying for:

  •         Learnerships
  •         Work Integrated Learning
  •         Internships
  •         Bursaries
  •         Skills programmes

 

SERVICES SETA

The Services Sector Education and Training Authority (Services SETA) hereby invites suitable entities to apply for discretionary grant funding. These grants are intended to meet the sector needs as set out in the Sector Skills Plan (SSP), Strategic Plan and the priorities set out in the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) 

This call for application is targeted at funding:

  • Training on the following Services SETA qualifications / programmes: o accredited full or part qualifications, o credit bearing skills programmes and Internship programmes;
  • Training programmes to be funded will include practical and theoretical components that are meaningful for the development of the individual learner in order to achieve substantial progress towards a qualification.

Who can apply?

The Services SETA is a public institution and is therefore obliged to avail business and skills development training opportunities to all South Africans who meet its requirements. All stakeholders and role-players with the requisite capacity and good standing legally may, therefore, apply for Services SETA funded interventions.

Given the special nature of skills development broadly and with regard to SETAs specifically, this Services SETA’s discretionary funding is applicable to:

  • Services SETA levy paying companies
  • Non-levy paying companies in the services sector
  • Services SETA accredited training providers
  • Non-Government Organisations and Non-Profit Organisations
  • Community-Based Organisations
  • Public Institutions, including public Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET)

Colleges and Higher Education and Training (HET) Institutions

  • Trade Unions associated with the Services SETA and/or in the Services sector
  • Joint venture partnerships and consortiums from small Skills Development Providers in the Services sector will be given preference

Note:

  • Stakeholders who applied during any previous Discretionary Grant Allocation windows are welcome to apply during this new window of funding whether their previous applications were successful or not.

Application Process

  • The application window will open on 27 November 2017 at 8:00 am and will close on 29 December 2017 at 4:00 pm.

MQA SETA

MQA ( The Mining Quality Assurance) SETA has opened the Discretionary Grants 2018/19 window, which will close on 31 January 2018

Discretionary grant funding, is funding available from the SETA for you to train your staff members.

The benefits of Discretionary grants:

  •         The grant can assist with upskilling your employees
  •         The grant can assist you with your Skills Spend under your BBBEE scorecard
  •         Address scarce and critical skills within the sector.

The following types of interventions are available that Eskilz can assist you in applying for:

  •         TVET College Support – NCV Level 4 Graduates
  •         Non-Artisan Learnerships (core)
  •         Workplace Coach Development
  •         Mine Community Development, including the training of retrenched workers
  •         Youth Development

 

Eskilz as a registered Skills Development facilitator with the MQA SETA, will assist you in applying for the grant, to ensure 100% compliancy.

Once the grant has been awarded to the company, Eskilz will assist you in introducing accredited training providers as well as the roll out of the grant award.

Should you have any questions Contact admin@eskilz.co.za or call 0100300080..