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Human Resources Management and Practices Support Learning Programme

Eskilz College Education

Did you know that we offer a FET Certificate in Human Resources Management and Practices Support Learning Programme?

(NQF Level 4)

Brief overview of the Purpose of this course:

This qualification will be useful to people who support and participate in human resources management and practices.

People credited with this qualification are able to:

Collect, collate, and distribute information related to people management in line with a given plan.

Provide advice on or refer to appropriate person in response to queries on organisation procedures related to people management.

Demonstrate basic understanding of people dynamics and impact in the workplace.

Demonstrate basic understanding of the functioning of business and the role and contribution of individuals within organisations.

Support the implementation of processes and systems related to human resources management and practices in all of the following role clusters:

> Strategic planning for human resources management and practices, people and work.

> Acquisition, development and utilisation of people.

> Establishment and improvement of labour and employee relations.

> Compensation and administration related to human resources management and practices.

Rationale of Human Resources:

Organisations require persons who are able to support human resources management processes and practices.

There is also a need for an initial qualification as a possible first leg of a learning progression path in the human resources management and practices field.

Learners need the qualification to increase their access to employment. It will enable persons who are fulfilling some of the support roles in human resources management and practices without formal qualifications to obtain recognition for their competence.

The specified components in the core category will ensure portability across the Human Resources Management and Practices role clusters, whilst the elective category will make provision for specialisation in a specific area..

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What if your parents don’t agree with your study choice?

Many Matriculants considering their study options for next year are finding themselves in the difficult position of being at odds with their parents or guardians about their preferred direction. While this conundrum has always been around, it is even more pronounced today, given that there are a myriad qualifications and careers that didn’t exist even a few years ago.

Parents often have expectations of the potential careers they see their children pursuing and it can be hard for them and their children to get on the same page when the parents are in favour of the more traditional qualifications, while the child would prefer to pursue a qualification the parents don’t know much about.

Education experts say it is important for families to have a respectful dialogue based on facts and research when they find themselves in this position.

The following might help both parent and child:

DO THE RESEARCH AND UNDERSTAND THE OPTIONS

There are many more study options today than in the past. The range of qualifications on offer has grown exponentially, while the institutions offering them have also multiplied. All registered and accredited higher education institutions – whether they be public universities or private – are registered by the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET). They are only registered if they have been accredited by the Council on Higher Education (CHE) and registered by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).

Looking up a qualification on the NQF is as easy as going to the SAQA website and typing in a few words. An institution should also be able to give you the SAQA identity number immediately. This means that prospective students and their parents can be confident about the bona fides of any qualification they want to pursue, provided that the institution is recognised by DHET and the programme is listed on the NQF which can be found on the SAQA website.

FACE REALITY

The world of work looks a lot different today than it did a decade ago, with numerous new and emerging careers on offer, such as brand management, big data analysis, app development, and digital design, to name a few. The traditional, generic 3-year degree is no longer a golden ticket to landing a job.

Prospective students would do well to pursue a career-focused qualification which fits well with their talents and interests, and which will prepare them to step into the workplace with confidence. Career-focused qualifications will often also include work-integrated learning, which allows students to build a portfolio of work throughout their time at varsity. This puts them in a much stronger position after graduation when applying for a position.

UNDERSTAND THE MARKETPLACE

What can you do with your qualification after graduation? That is an important question to ask before committing to a programme. A great way to determine the demand for a qualification and your future earning potential, is to look at career sites and job ads, to see how much demand there is in marketplace. Speaking to an advisor at a higher education institution’s career centre can also go a long way to clarifying your prospects post-graduation.

UNDERSTAND THE MOTIVATION FOR STUDYING

Pursuing a degree requires a substantial investment of time and money. And handling the demands of higher education and young adulthood is not a walk in the park. The dropout rate among first years is very high, in part because the reason for heading to university wasn’t sound.

So if the motivation for further study is for the sake of status rather than to lay the foundations for a specific and successful career, or if a student is only studying to fulfil the wishes of their parents, it would be better to wait, investigate all the options, and only apply when they have found something that gets them really excited about your future.

Parents need to understand that the best approach now is to study and prepare for a world that’s changing, and that the traditional way and ‘safe’ careers may not be the best course of action.

Students need to understand that while the difference in opinion may be frustrating, it is up to them to present their case calmly, clearly and respectfully, with the research to back up the viability and prospects of their choice.

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Categories
Post

What if your parents don’t agree with your study choice?

Many Matriculants considering their study options for next year are finding themselves in the difficult position of being at odds with their parents or guardians about their preferred direction. While this conundrum has always been around, it is even more pronounced today, given that there are a myriad qualifications and careers that didn’t exist even a few years ago.

Parents often have expectations of the potential careers they see their children pursuing and it can be hard for them and their children to get on the same page when the parents are in favour of the more traditional qualifications, while the child would prefer to pursue a qualification the parents don’t know much about.

Education experts say it is important for families to have a respectful dialogue based on facts and research when they find themselves in this position.

The following might help both parent and child:

DO THE RESEARCH AND UNDERSTAND THE OPTIONS

There are many more study options today than in the past. The range of qualifications on offer has grown exponentially, while the institutions offering them have also multiplied. All registered and accredited higher education institutions – whether they be public universities or private – are registered by the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET). They are only registered if they have been accredited by the Council on Higher Education (CHE) and registered by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).

Looking up a qualification on the NQF is as easy as going to the SAQA website and typing in a few words. An institution should also be able to give you the SAQA identity number immediately. This means that prospective students and their parents can be confident about the bona fides of any qualification they want to pursue, provided that the institution is recognised by DHET and the programme is listed on the NQF which can be found on the SAQA website.

FACE REALITY

The world of work looks a lot different today than it did a decade ago, with numerous new and emerging careers on offer, such as brand management, big data analysis, app development, and digital design, to name a few. The traditional, generic 3-year degree is no longer a golden ticket to landing a job.

Prospective students would do well to pursue a career-focused qualification which fits well with their talents and interests, and which will prepare them to step into the workplace with confidence. Career-focused qualifications will often also include work-integrated learning, which allows students to build a portfolio of work throughout their time at varsity. This puts them in a much stronger position after graduation when applying for a position.

UNDERSTAND THE MARKETPLACE

What can you do with your qualification after graduation? That is an important question to ask before committing to a programme. A great way to determine the demand for a qualification and your future earning potential, is to look at career sites and job ads, to see how much demand there is in marketplace. Speaking to an advisor at a higher education institution’s career centre can also go a long way to clarifying your prospects post-graduation.

UNDERSTAND THE MOTIVATION FOR STUDYING

Pursuing a degree requires a substantial investment of time and money. And handling the demands of higher education and young adulthood is not a walk in the park. The dropout rate among first years is very high, in part because the reason for heading to university wasn’t sound.

So if the motivation for further study is for the sake of status rather than to lay the foundations for a specific and successful career, or if a student is only studying to fulfil the wishes of their parents, it would be better to wait, investigate all the options, and only apply when they have found something that gets them really excited about your future.

Parents need to understand that the best approach now is to study and prepare for a world that’s changing, and that the traditional way and ‘safe’ careers may not be the best course of action.

Students need to understand that while the difference in opinion may be frustrating, it is up to them to present their case calmly, clearly and respectfully, with the research to back up the viability and prospects of their choice.

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EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT SOUTH AFRICA

Over 350 learners with disabilities have enrolled for the Early Childhood Development level 4 learnership at Eskilz College. The learners are doing three to four months theory and nine to 10 months practicals, and next year they will be enrolling in level 5 which will qualify them as Grade R teachers working with children from the ages 0-6 years. The goal for Eskilz College is to close the gap in the demand for Early Childhood Practitioners and to provide skills and employment for people with disabilities.
An Early Childhood Development qualification affords these learners with career opportunities such as working at ECD centres, primary schools and crèches. But Eskilz College doesn’t just want it to end there; the learners will be assisted to register with The South African Council of Educators (SACE) and also assisted and encouraged to open up their own ECD centres in their communities.

Eskilz College is looking for partners to place these learners to do their work placement next year, we are looking for ECD centres, Primary schools and any institutions that need ECD practitioners. The placement will be a 9 to 10 months internship.

The learners are receiving a monthly stipend that covers transport for their theory. This is a great opportunity for the learners and a good way to close the national gap in the need for early childhood practitioners.

To enquire or place a learner contact coo@timmalholding.co.za or call 0100 3000 80

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ECD leaners looking for placement

Over 350 learners with disabilities have enrolled for the Early Childhood Development level 4 learnership at Eskilz College. The learners are doing three to four months theory and nine to 10 months practicals, and next year they will be enrolling in level 5 which will qualify them as Grade R teachers working with children from the ages 0-6 years.
The goal for Eskilz College is to close the gap in the demand for Early Childhood Practitioners and to provide skills and employment for people with disabilities.
An Early Childhood Development qualification affords these learners with career opportunities such as working at ECD centres, primary schools and crèches. But Eskilz doesn’t just want it to end there; the learners will be assisted to register with The South African Council of Educators (SACE) and also assisted and encouraged to open up their own ECD centres in their communities.

Eskilz College is looking for partners to place these learners to do their work placement next year, we are looking for ECD centres, Primary schools and any institutions that need ECD practitioners. The placement will be a 9 to 10 months internship.

The learners are receiving a monthly stipend that covers transport for their theory. This is a great opportunity for the learners and a good way to close the national gap in the need for early childhood practitioners.

To enquire or place a learner contact coo@timmalholding.co.za or call 0100 3000 80

 OPTIONS

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Youth encouraged to volunteer

By volunteering, young people develop life skills and become well-rounded individuals.

Starting young provides an opportunity for students to learn and grow into valuable members of society. They develop life skills as they get immersed in activities that are outside of their comfort zones. They become socially aware and learn to appreciate their life and value what they have, especially when they realise that their problems would seem like a vacation for most people.

Another benefit is volunteering helps students get into college. Volunteering helps students become competent, employable, and better meet their learning objectives.

Another opportunity to take advantage of is becoming competent and employable after meeting all learning objectives. Volunteering also serves as a training ground for honing students’ skills. This will give them an edge over those who do not have any volunteer experience.  Students are encouraged to join volunteer programs during school breaks or over the summer.

Employers seek volunteer experience from fresh graduates.

As mentioned, employable skills develop by volunteering because it serves as supplemental training. Employers prefer hiring fresh graduates with volunteer experience. It shows commitment and a sense of responsibility. Volunteers are reliable, selfless, responsible, and willing to do more than what is asked even without monetary compensation. These are qualities that employers look for when hiring fresh graduates.

We’ve outlined a few of the benefits of volunteering. But how do we motivate students to devote more time to volunteer work?

1. Define the purpose.

Defining the real purpose of why they should volunteer is a great way to motivate them. Earning extra credit for school or gaining new skills are poor motivators. They must understand the real impact of volunteering. Try to explain to them the weight of what they’re about to do and how they can make a difference in the world. Give them a purpose and let them take it from there.

2. Allow them to be independent.

Grant them the full autonomy for their choices and decisions. No one likes being forced to do something. Letting them be independent can make them feel like they are trusted, and by human nature, the more trust being placed to a person, the more responsible they become.

3. Empathize with them.

Most of the time, adults forget to empathize with their kids. By nature, when one doesn’t feel understood, they will never try to understand. If they are not up to volunteering, do not dismiss it as them being irresponsible and selfish. Try to understand where they are coming from and maybe, both parties will agree to compromise. Sometimes, empathy is all it takes to be able to motivate or encourage them to volunteer.

4. Lead them by example.

 Always walk your talk. Kids, especially teenagers, may not be the best at listening to parents or elders. Yet, they may begin to imitate the actions of adults. If they see adults put their passion into good use, they will be inspired to do the same.

5. Provide fun learning activities.

Some students think that volunteer work is boring, tiring, and requires too much time and physical strength. Fun is one of the best motivators. Add fun to your volunteer opportunity by incorporating activities like games into learning activities.

This is especially good if the volunteer work is for a group of kids from poor communities. It will create a bond between volunteers and the kids. Also, it will help volunteers avoid all the stress of volunteering.

6. Provide positive feedback and recognize their efforts.

Feeling unappreciated is the best way to kill motivation, especially when you are doing something that is actually making a difference. When you tell people you appreciate what they do, they tend to do more of it. Recognize their efforts and they will work harder.

Universities and educational institutions can show their appreciation of student volunteers’ efforts by giving them extra credit.

Parents, educational institutions, and universities should work together to inspire volunteerism among the youth through programs that are aimed at encouraging their civic behavior.

Create more opportunities for volunteer work and inspire young people to volunteer by encouraging them to start young. Give them purpose and let them do the work. Appreciate their efforts and eventually, they will work hard and reap the benefits. They will grow up as well-rounded individuals that are competent, socially aware, and useful members of their society. Volunteering can also help them succeed in life when they embark on a new journey after college.

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Post

Youth encouraged to volunteer

By volunteering, young people develop life skills and become well-rounded individuals.

Starting young provides an opportunity for students to learn and grow into valuable members of society. They develop life skills as they get immersed in activities that are outside of their comfort zones. They become socially aware and learn to appreciate their life and value what they have, especially when they realise that their problems would seem like a vacation for most people.

Another benefit is volunteering helps students get into college. Volunteering helps students become competent, employable, and better meet their learning objectives.

Another opportunity to take advantage of is becoming competent and employable after meeting all learning objectives. Volunteering also serves as a training ground for honing students’ skills. This will give them an edge over those who do not have any volunteer experience.  Students are encouraged to join volunteer programs during school breaks or over the summer.

Employers seek volunteer experience from fresh graduates.

As mentioned, employable skills develop by volunteering because it serves as supplemental training. Employers prefer hiring fresh graduates with volunteer experience. It shows commitment and a sense of responsibility. Volunteers are reliable, selfless, responsible, and willing to do more than what is asked even without monetary compensation. These are qualities that employers look for when hiring fresh graduates.

We’ve outlined a few of the benefits of volunteering. But how do we motivate students to devote more time to volunteer work?

1. Define the purpose.

Defining the real purpose of why they should volunteer is a great way to motivate them. Earning extra credit for school or gaining new skills are poor motivators. They must understand the real impact of volunteering. Try to explain to them the weight of what they’re about to do and how they can make a difference in the world. Give them a purpose and let them take it from there.

2. Allow them to be independent.

Grant them the full autonomy for their choices and decisions. No one likes being forced to do something. Letting them be independent can make them feel like they are trusted, and by human nature, the more trust being placed to a person, the more responsible they become.

3. Empathize with them.

Most of the time, adults forget to empathize with their kids. By nature, when one doesn’t feel understood, they will never try to understand. If they are not up to volunteering, do not dismiss it as them being irresponsible and selfish. Try to understand where they are coming from and maybe, both parties will agree to compromise. Sometimes, empathy is all it takes to be able to motivate or encourage them to volunteer.

4. Lead them by example.

 Always walk your talk. Kids, especially teenagers, may not be the best at listening to parents or elders. Yet, they may begin to imitate the actions of adults. If they see adults put their passion into good use, they will be inspired to do the same.

5. Provide fun learning activities.

Some students think that volunteer work is boring, tiring, and requires too much time and physical strength. Fun is one of the best motivators. Add fun to your volunteer opportunity by incorporating activities like games into learning activities.

This is especially good if the volunteer work is for a group of kids from poor communities. It will create a bond between volunteers and the kids. Also, it will help volunteers avoid all the stress of volunteering.

6. Provide positive feedback and recognize their efforts.

Feeling unappreciated is the best way to kill motivation, especially when you are doing something that is actually making a difference. When you tell people you appreciate what they do, they tend to do more of it. Recognize their efforts and they will work harder.

Universities and educational institutions can show their appreciation of student volunteers’ efforts by giving them extra credit.

Parents, educational institutions, and universities should work together to inspire volunteerism among the youth through programs that are aimed at encouraging their civic behavior.

Create more opportunities for volunteer work and inspire young people to volunteer by encouraging them to start young. Give them purpose and let them do the work. Appreciate their efforts and eventually, they will work hard and reap the benefits. They will grow up as well-rounded individuals that are competent, socially aware, and useful members of their society. Volunteering can also help them succeed in life when they embark on a new journey after college.

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Learnerships vs Internships

It is paramount to know the difference between a Learnership and an Internship. Many people, not only confuse the two, but also confuse a bursary with a learnership. The reason why it is essential to know the difference between the two is due the fact that you will be able to apply for the correct thing based on your knowledge or highest qualification, whether it be a grade 12 certificate or a degree.

Here is the difference between the two:

A Learnership offers training in a specific field while earning money simultaneously and is primarily for people with matric as their highest qualification. You should be awarded a certificate after completion of a learnership which indicates your level of achievement. You will then be able to look for a job or further your education in that specific field.

An Internship is an opportunity for people with a degree or diploma to gain practical experience in a possible place of employment or in their field of study. Interns are employed at a company for a limited amount of time which lasts from one week to 12 months. Most times, an internship is required during your study course in order to complete your qualification. Just as with a Learnership, you also get paid during an Internship.

Basically, a Learnership is better suited for someone with a grade 12 as their highest education, while an internship benefits someone who is actively completing their degree or diploma and an apprenticeship is a 3-4-year labour programme that trains you in a very specific trade.

For learnership opportunities, contact Eskilz College admin@eskilz.co.za 0100300080.

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5 Reasons Your CV Isn’t Getting Noticed

Applying for jobs can be an incredibly frustrating process. There’s nothing more demoralising than spending hours crafting the perfect application only to hear nothing back – especially when you feel that your skills and experience would have been perfect for the role. However, if you are finding that you are consistently falling at the first hurdle, there’s probably something wrong, and that something is probably your CV. Studies have shown that recruiters spend an average of 6 seconds looking at a CV, so it’s crucial to grab their attention quickly and make sure the key details are at the forefront. Here’s five reasons your CV might not be getting noticed.

You’ve got relevant experience…but it’s on the third page.

It’s amazing how many people organise their work experience chronologically on their CV, starting with their first job and working through in order. A CV shouldn’t be a dispassionate list of all the jobs you’ve ever had, it should be a sales pitch emphasising why you are the perfect candidate for the job. If you’re applying for a marketing position, the first job a recruiter sees on your CV should be a marketing role, not the paper round you had when you were thirteen. Order your experience according to relevance for the job to which you’re applying, and you’ll find you have much greater success.

It’s full of buzzwords

So, you’re hard-working, passionate and self-motivated? So is everyone else, unfortunately. Whilst these are undoubtedly qualities that companies are looking for in an employee, they’re unlikely to make anyone take notice of your CV. Rather than stating these qualities over and over, fill your CV with hard facts that prove them to be true. Instead of saying you’re target-oriented, say that you have consistently met or surpassed your targets in all of your previous roles.

It’s five pages long

As mentioned, recruiters generally only scan through a CV, picking out the important details. So, brevity really is crucial – if your CV is four or five pages long, you’re increasing the chance that your most relevant achievements and experience will be missed. As a general rule, it’s good to keep it to no more than two pages, including only your most relevant experience.

Dodgy spelling, grammar and punctuation

It sounds obvious, but it’s surprising how many people have basic errors on their CV. Your CV is your first chance to present your case and make an impression, so make sure you don’t shoot yourself in the foot with easily avoidable mistakes. Poor spelling and grammar look sloppy and unprofessional, and that’s not the first impression you want to make when applying for a job.

You’ve left gaps unexplained

There’s nothing wrong with having long periods of inactivity on your CV, but these need to be fully explained. Maybe you took a career break to do some travelling or volunteer work, maybe you put your career on hold to concentrate on your family; there’s nothing wrong with these per se, but they should be flagged on your CV. Otherwise, a recruiter may assume there’s something amiss, and you might not get the credit your experience deserves..

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SONA 2018 – Summary of key points made by President Cyril Ramaphosa

Summary of Actions in the State of the Nation Address 16th February 2018

Transformation
Support black industrialists – to build a new generation of black and women producers that are able to build enterprises of significant scale and capability.
Use competition policy to open markets to new black entrants.
Invest in the development of township and rural enterprises.

Infrastructure
Assemble team to speed up implementation of new projects, particularly water projects, health facilities and road maintenance.

Mining
Intensify engagements will all stakeholders on the Mining Charter.
Finalise the MPRDA Amendment Bill by end of first quarter this year.
Stakeholder engagement to deal with mining fatalities.

Small business, co-ops, township enterprises
Honour 30% of procurement allocation to these enterprises.
Invest in SME incubation.
Welcome SME Fund initiative by corporate sector.

Land and agriculture
Accelerate our land redistribution programme AND make more land available.
Expropriate land without compensation, our approach, taking into account food security, agricultural production and growth of the sector.

Fourth industrial revolution
Digital Industrial revolution commission to be established.
Allocation of spectrum to reduce barriers to entry.

National Minimum Wage
Introduce NMW by May 1 benefiting more than 6 million South Africans.

Health and NHI
Scale up our testing and treating campaign by initiating an additional two million people on anti-retroviral treatment by December 2020.
The NHI Bill is now ready to be processed through government and will be submitted to Parliament in the next few weeks.

Education
This year free higher education and training will be available to first year students from households with a gross combined annual income of up to R350,000.
All public schools have begun offering an African language.
First National Senior Certificate examination on South African Sign Language, which will be offered to deaf learners at the end of 2018.

Social Grants
Urgently take decisive steps to comply with all directions of the Constitutional Court.
Take action to ensure no person in government is undermining implementation deadlines set by the court.

Social Sector/Civil Society
Convene a Social Sector Summit during the course of this year to recognise the critical role they play in society.

State/governance
Review the funding models of SOEs and other measures.
Change the way that boards are appointed.
Remove board members from any role in procurement.

Corruption/state capture
The commission of inquiry into state capture to commence its work shortly.
The Commission should not displace the regular work of the country’s law enforcement agencies in investigating and prosecuting any and all acts of corruption.
Urge professional bodies and regulatory authorities to take action against members who are found to have acted improperly and unethically.
Urgently attend to the leadership issues at the National Prosecuting Authority to ensure that this critical institution is stabilised and able to perform its mandate unhindered.
Appoint a Commission of Inquiry into Tax Administration and Governance of Sars.
Visit every national department to engage with senior leadership to ensure that the work of government is effectively aligned.

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